Sunday, September 11, 2016

Remembering September 11, 2001: And A Tribute To Our Many Heroes by Margo Hoornstra

 
 
Fifteen years ago today, our nation, the United States of America, was forever changed. But was it really? Maybe we're more aware of the great freedoms we have in this country--and, because of that, what we have to lose. In my opinion, though, we're still okay. Because we're fortunate for those in our military and the law enforcement community so dedicated and devoted to serve, protect and keep us all safe.
 
 
 

I'm honored to be the friend, granddaughter, daughter, sister, niece, cousin, wife and mother to some of them.



Please join me in remembering, and honoring, so many, many heroes who live among us.




For me, it never gets old, or taken for granted. Each and every time I think of those courageous individuals and what they do.

It takes my breath away every time.

Thank you all.

My days to blog here are the 11th and 23rd. I can also be found at:

www.margohoornstra.com

14 comments:

Vonnie Davis said...

I still can't watch the videos of the planes hitting those towers without feeling like it can't be happening. The whole event was surreal and still is in my mind--and yet it happened. So many lives were snuffed out. So many still suffer physically and emotionally from those horrific events.

Rolynn Anderson said...

Like Vonnie, I have trouble thinking about the event as real...it was too much like a movie made by a brilliant director and editor...as an apocalyptic warning. We can only hope that we've learned enough from this tragedy and their sacrifice to move toward peace. Though terrorism, worldwide, is on a downturn, I worry about the nutter in North Korea. His missile tests are causing earthquakes at 5.1 magnitude! Now that the Russia/Syria situation looks more hopeful, we'll have to focus on calming North Korea. We've certainly learned that wall-building is not the answer.

Jannine Gallant said...

I'd have to think intelligence gathering is the key to avoiding more catastrophic events. Hopefully that sector is growing stronger (and implementation of knowledge wiser) so our police and firefighters won't be forced into more scenarios like 9-11. I doubt any of us will ever forget the horror of those images.

Margo Hoornstra said...

Vonnie, It is so very hard to believe, even now, the horrible event even happened. The good news is, right after, we rallied together and take care of each other each day.

Rolynn, Here's hoping we're moving toward peace. Reaching out beats wall building each and every day. I couldn't let this anniversary pass without recognizing its significance. The good news is there are more good guys than bad guys in the world. I'm sure of it!

Jannine, We all have to get smarter, and I think we have. We'll always have those willing to serve and protect us. I'm thinking we aren't supposed to forget.

Leah St. James said...

I lived in the NYC metropolitan area at the time--about 45 miles to the south. I remember watching on TV in my office building and, like several said, thinking it looked like a big-budget Hollywood movie. I soon learned how very real it was for the people in my town who died and lost loved ones, or who couldn't reach a loved one and feared the worst...or when the air filled with foul-smelling smoke that lasted for days.

Some people wonder why we take time to remember this day every year, and I think it's because we need to remember that, despite all the problems in this country and world, there are many, many everyday heroes among us who will strap on firefighting gear and climb up a skyscraper toward the fire, and those like the passengers of United flight 93 who did what they could to thwart evil that day. It's so humbling to me.

Many thanks to all who gave (and those who continue to give) so selflessly

Diane Burton said...

Margo, we have to remember. If we get complacent, it could happen again. Thank God for those 1st responders who went in despite the fear they'd not come back out. And thank God for the police, TSA, Homeland Security, FBI, etc. who are dedicated to protecting us. A bigger concern than gathering info is sharing it among the agencies. The info was there before 9-11, but the agencies didn't share. Tragic.

Diane Garner said...

I remember how united Americans were after 9/11. Now we've become so divided and disagree on almost everything. I pray it doesn't take another tragedy to get us back together.

Margo Hoornstra said...

You're right, Leah. The aftermath was almost as gut wrenching as the tragedy itself. As I've said, we do have an abundance of heroes in this country. Humbles me too.

We're an intelligent nation, Diane, we'll figure it out. Exactly, the worst thing we can do is become complacent. I have faith in us!

Here's hoping we can reunite on our own, Diane. I think we can!

Andrea Downing said...

As a New Yorker, born and bred, albeit one who was living abroad at the time, the memory of that day is ever present for me. How I struggled to make sure my family were all right, the lines all engaged from the UK, and the stories from my brother and nephew--watching tanks go down Park Ave, watching falling bodies from an office window. Even now, the numbers defy me--that so many people died that day. And now my daughter happens to work in the Empire State Building so always, always in the back of my mind is that kind of terrorism.
I for one won't forget.

Margo Hoornstra said...

Andi. Can't imagine the terror you went through not knowing. Our safety is not something we can take for granted. How senseless people want to harm others. Why?

Susan Coryell said...

The father (a colonel) of one of my former students was killed in the Pentagon attack. So close in many ways to us in Virginia--a day that changed the fabric of our freedom. Thanks for a thoughtful post.

Margo Hoornstra said...

Changed us, Susan, in some of the most horrible ways. But, I think also changed us to be more resilient.

Alicia Dean said...

I know the internet is flooded with 911 related posts and such, but it's worth remembering, worth respecting and mourning those who gave their lives that horrific day. It's difficult to rewatch and feel those feelings again. I have the UTMOST gratitude and respect to the heroes who have and continue to risk their lives. God bless this country.

Jolana Malkston said...

I have relatives who have served in law enforcement (now retired). My admiration for them, and for the heroic police officers and firefighters of 9/11, knows no bounds. I am in awe of their dedication to protect us and of their ability to run into the path of danger when the rest of us are running in the opposite direction. I'd like to believe I could do that if one of my loved ones were in danger. Incredibly, the police and firefighters do it for perfect strangers. Their courage, caring, and nobility is astounding. It breaks my heart that 15 years after their magnificent display of bravery and sacrifice for others, the police are unappreciated, vilified, and even demonized on an almost daily basis by a small segment of the population with no conception of what it means to live a life of selfless service. The annual 9/11 memorials and documentories that are broadcast serve as yearly reminders that the denigrators of the police who view them as oppressors are wrong, wrong, so wrong.